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Road to the Rising- Eamon Ó Duibhir (1883-1963)

Eamon Ó Duibhir, who was born in Ballagh, county Tipperary, came from a farming background. He was one of six children, two boys and four girls, born to John Dwyer and Mary Crough. He left school at the age of twelve and, in 1905, he joined the Gaelic League and went on to teach Irish. In 1908 he joined Sinn Féin and later the IRB. He set up a Volunteer corps in Ballagh. Prior to the rising in 1916 he worked extensively in Limerick, Tipperary and Waterford collecting arms for the Volunteers. On his way to Dublin to join the rebels in Easter week he was arrested and was interned in Reading Jail. He was released on Christmas Eve and returned to Ireland.

At the start of 1917, Ó Duibhir secured a loan and bought Kilshenane house and farm, near Cashel. The plan was to use it as a base for the Gaelic League, Sinn Féin and Volunteer meetings. During the next few years Kilshenane was raided on several occasions by the RIC. In September 1920 a detachment of soldiers from the Lincoln regiment searching for Ó Duibhir, looted it and burned it to the ground.

During the War of Independence Ó Duibhir served as Assistant Quarter-master to Dan Breen. His duties were to secure, arms and finances. He served six terms of imprisonment in Cork Jail and was incarcerated in Belfast, Durham and Wormwood Scrubs. In Belfast, he was one of 14 prisoners sentenced to a diet of bread and water for 14 days and tied up in a strait jacket. In Wormwood Scrubs he took part in a hunger strike. In 1921 he was captured by the RIC and brought to Dublin Castle, where he was savagely beaten by intelligence officers. He was not involved in the Civil War.

In 1919 he married Winifred O’Sullivan. They had a family of two, a boy and a girl. After the troubles ended he took up a career as a writer of folklore and history and wrote for a regular basis for the Nenagh Guardian and the Tipperary Star. He died on 2 June, 1963 and was buried in Cluain Albha cemetery.

View Eamon O’ Duibhir’s Witness Statement on the following link:
Eamon O’Dwyer / O ‘Duibhir - http://www.bureauofmilitaryhistory.ie/reels/bmh/BMH.WS1474.pdf
Eamon O’Dwyer / O ‘Duibhir - http://www.bureauofmilitaryhistory.ie/reels/bmh/BMH.WS1403.pdf

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